Base Layers – A Rainbow Coloured Sporting Phenomenon

Does anybody remember Robbie Fowler’s nasal strips from yesteryear? As a young lad growing up, I remember watching Liverpool on TV and seeing him wear those famous nasal strips, which helped him breathe better throughout exercise. I always remember wishing I could buy some and wear them playing for my team on a Sunday morning. Incidentally I never did try one, but I do remember coming across some opponents who had talked their parents into buying them some.

Indirectly this leads me on to the discussion of Base Layer Clothing. Now I am not suggesting the use of base layer clothing is as dubious as Robbie’s nasal strips, but I do draw upon some similarities in the sporting accessory phenomenon that can be created when world class athletes exhibit a new technology to the viewing public. The introduction of base layer clothing has been both a purposeful and fashionable fixture in sport for the last few years. They have technical qualities which give them scientific reason as to why they can help get that extra percentile out of an athlete’s performance. As with any sports development, it has found it’s way into all levels of all sports and has created a large industry off the back of it where all of the major sports brands have developed a product range of these base layer items.

The main purpose of most base layer items are as cooling performance products. They allow the body to breathe and transfer moisture away from the body more quickly therefore allowing the athlete to remain cool and dry during activity. The opposite version of this is the base layer to be worn in cold weather, which keeps the body warm. The third type of these is a compression layer which stimulates blood flow to the muscles and allows greater supply of oxygen to fuel the muscles during exercise. Base Layers can manifest themselves in T-shirts, vests, shorts, underwear, trousers, and socks

The sporting authorities had to react quickly however, as kits were becoming a clash of the base layer colours and kit colours. They introduced regulations, which dictated that base layer garments must match the colour of the kits they are wearing over it. The brands then set to work making a rainbow spectrum of great base layer colours to choose from. To this end Banana Moon are really delighted to introduce the famous rugby brand Rhino to our website with the introduction of their teamwear base layer garment, the RH001 and children’s version RH001B. This comes in 11 wonderfully vibrant colours and can be printed with your club logo or name on the front, back or even down the sleeves.

RH001 Base Layer Garment

Click the links to view them on our website or even give us a call on 01924 420022 for a full quote

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